It’s Time to Buy That Hunting Camp….

Fall hunting season is upon us here in the Upper Peninsula. If you’re a hunter yourself, then you already know that a great location is something to treasure and that many special memories are made at camp. Owning a successful, private spot to enjoy season after season is the ultimate dream for many hunters. For those of you still searching for your perfect ‘deer camp’ to call your own, we have plenty to choose from!

Maybe you’re looking for a simple, rustic camp that’s just enough to lay your head before you’re off again at dawn; or maybe you want all the comforts and convenience of home. Are you looking to bunk just a few or a do you have a oversized crew? Whether you’re after deer, turkey, bear, grouse, or even your own fishing hole…Northern Michigan Land Brokers can find a property that suits your needs!

$199,900 // MLS#1116486// Crystal Falls, MI

This 2 bed, 1 bath camp sits on 320 acres in Iron County, a prime area for big bucks in UP! The large, varied acreage, along with water features, make this area spectacular for hunting deer, grouse and bear, and trout fishing as well as ATV, hiking, snowmobiling, etc. The camp is user friendly with wood/propane heat and a drilled well. Acreage has good access, is gated for privacy and has a good stand of hardwood timber that could provide some income as well.

$39,900 // MLS#1111333 // Little Lake, MI


This hunting camp is a great opportunity for those looking for space on a tight budget. The camp itself is solid, has a private pond, and is large enough to sleep a dozen, and sits on 5 acres. However, you get to benefit of accessing the adjoining State and surrounding CFA lands to create a vast hunting area at a fraction of the price!

$110,000 // MLS#1117568 // Cornell, MI

If you’re looking for a something that feels more like a home, then this option in Southern Marquette County could be a winner. This is a simple home with a crawl space, but has a full kitchen and bath and a large living space and truly could be a year round residence. This area has a strong deer population and the fields on this acreage would make incredible food plots! The remainder of the acreage is thick cedar and mixed uplands which is great for wildlife cover.

$149,000 // MLS#1117131// Northland, MI


This outstanding choice sits on 120 acres in Southern Marquette County. The camp itself has been updated with indoor plumbing, double showers and a sauna, has been wired for a generator, and is ready to use immediately. Property is easily accessible, but gated for privacy and is bordered by State land on three sides! The West Branch of the Escanaba River runs just north of the property so not only is this a great hunting area, but has excellent trout fishing nearby as well.

$95,000 // MLS#1112591 // Au Train, MI

Located in Central Alger County, this property with 49 acres is in a fabulous recreation area near the National Forest. It is equipped with propane and has a drilled well and septic. Screened porch makes it easy to enjoy the peaceful setting or relax after hunting the plentiful deer and grouse here. Easy, year round access off the county road, a pond on the property and several nearby lakes, so you can enjoy fishing and water rec as well.

$110,000 // MLS#1112591// Thompson, MI

A beautiful log A-frame in Southern Schoolcraft County makes a cozy base camp and the warmer winters make for great hunting! Cabin comes furnished and with multiple blinds spread across the 40 acres so you can be season ready immediately!

These are just a sampling of our current hunting properties. For a more extensive list of hunting land, camps and cabins, click here.

In addition, a full list of all available properties can be found here.

How to Keep Trespassers Off Your Land

Whether you own a modest parcel or a sprawling domain, unwanted trespassers are always a concern. You deserve to be confident that your property is exclusively your own to enjoy, but how do you go about stopping uninvited interlopers? It’s a difficult question that every property owner must face at some point. Fortunately, there are several simple solutions that can help you safeguard your property and gain invaluable peace of mind.

Keep Your Property Posted

Everyone knows it’s illegal to trespass on private land, but there’s a key detail many people miss. For these laws to be enforceable, you need to make sure that any would-be trespasser knows they’re on your private property. That’s why keeping your land posted with the proper signage is crucial. It serves as both a potential deterrent and a legal notice to ensure you can enforce your boundaries.

However, it’s not quite as simple as just posting up some signs along your property lines. Each state has its own particular regulations regarding where and how to post your property. Depending on the laws in your state, you may also need to register your posting with the local town clerk or land office. Still, the minor inconvenience of properly posting your property is a small price to pay to keep your land protected.

Limit and Control Access Points

The reality is that there’s not much you can do to physically keep out someone who is determined to enter your property. In most cases, however, trespassers are simply opportunistic and can be easily dissuaded. You can make your property less easily accessible by using fences, gates and other physical barriers. Take some time to consider where trespassers are most likely to enter your property and focus on these areas in particular.

You can also use natural vegetation to create effective barriers that blend seamlessly into the surrounding land. Plant a combination of trees, shrubs and warm-season grasses along the borders of your property to help deter uninvited guests. These natural barriers also have the added benefit of making it more difficult for onlookers to see your property. For the best coverage and protection, consider using evergreen trees and perennial grasses that won’t need to be replanted every year.

Enlist Some Help

Robert Frost had the right idea when he wrote that good fences make good neighbors. Of course, the inverse is often true as well. Developing good relationships with your neighbors is often as effective a deterrent against trespassers as any sign or physical barrier. Good neighbors tend to keep an eye out for one another and are more likely to let you know if they’ve seen something suspicious on your property. They can also be extremely helpful when you aren’t around to monitor the property yourself.

On the other hand, it’s important to be careful about what you say to others. Boasting about the trophy bucks you’ve seen or all the work you’ve done to boost your property’s value can be tempting, but it may also make you a bigger target for trespassers. It’s better to keep a lower profile and avoid unwanted attention.

Capture It on Camera

Few things can make would-be lawbreakers reconsider their actions more quickly than the presence of a camera. Simply posting a few cameras in highly visible locations is often enough to dissuade visitors from taking liberties with your private land. It’s also a good idea to add some well-concealed cameras in the event that a particularly bold trespasser attempts to steal or damage the ones you’ve left in plain sight. Even if the cameras don’t turn a trespasser away, they’re still useful for collecting evidence that can later be used to prosecute the intruder.

It’s important to note that cameras are subject to a variety of regulations in many areas. In particular, it’s very important to review your local laws before installing cameras that capture video. Some states require that you post clear notices anywhere visitors may be recorded on video. Recording audio often introduces further legal complications, so it’s best to avoid capturing sound altogether. The goal is simply to make sure people know that they can’t access your property without being seen.

You have every right to control who can and cannot legally enter your property. Of course, having the right and having the ability are often two separate matters. The tips above will help you deter interlopers and make your property a less appealing target. It’s also important to act swiftly and seek prosecution if you do catch a trespasser on your land. In the end, the best deterrent is often simply making it clear that encroaching on your property comes with real consequences.

Original article written by Russell Jones, founder of PropertyWorkshop.com, and can be found at https://www.landhub.com/blog/how-to-keep-trespassers-off-your-land/

Top Four Takeaways from The 2018 Land Market Survey

The highly-anticipated Land Market Survey is out! Every year, REALTORS® Land Institute and the National Association of REALTORS® Research Group conduct this survey for land professionals across America to use as an informational resource. The land industry faced many challenges (such as natural disasters and uncertainty on the long-term effects of the current trade war) and many victories (such as the WOTUS ruling and an overall strong economy). Let’s take a look at some of the biggest takeaways from the 2018 Land Market Survey.

1. Land Prices Are On The Rise, But Slowly

Average land prices across America rose, but at a slower rate than previous years. Land prices rose 2% in 2018, compared to 3% in 2017. This slower gain could be a result of rising interest rates and depressed commodity prices.

2. The Price of Land Bought and Sold Went Down

Across all land types, the median price per acre decreased to $4,500. The amount of land being bought and sold also decreased to a median of 53 acres. However, some land types actually saw higher sizes and prices in 2018. Agricultural irrigated land, timber, recreational, and ranch land all increased in price per acre over the year, while agricultural non-irrigated, timber, residential, and ranch land increased in property size.

3. Financing Was The Number One Issue Facing The Land Industry

49% of respondents said that financing was an issue affecting the land industry. Local zoning, federal zoning, state regulations, and tariffs were also mentioned as top issues.

4. Land Is Being Sold Faster.

While some land types struggled in 2018, the median number of days a property would sit on the market decreased from 95 in 2017 to 90 in 2018.

As with any year, 2018 was a year of many ups and downs for the land industry. It’s impossible to predict what will happen next, especially in this industry. However, the data from the Land Market Survey can help us plan for whatever 2019 has in store for us and help make it the best year yet.

Want to learn more about the current state of the land market? On January 23, Scholastica (Gay) Cororaton, a research economist at the National Association of REALTORS®, hosted a survey going into the nuts and bolts of the Land Market Survey. The live webinar quickly sold out, but don’t panic! You can still watch the recording for free on our webinar archive page. The recording will be posted the week of January 28th.

by Laura Barker, January 25, 2019 [Your] Land Blog, RLI Post, The Voices of Land

4 Reasons Winter is the Perfect Time to Sell Your Land

26 Dec ’18 by Caroline Kirby for Land.com

There’s this myth that certain things can’t be done in the winter as if cold weather makes it impossible to get things done. While it can certainly make things uncomfortable or difficult if you’re not a fan of cooler temps, selling land isn’t likely to be affected. Today we’re here to help you understand why!

So, if you’re debating whether or not to pull your listings down until the spring, hear us out on some reasons why winter may actually be the best time to make a sale!

1 Buyers are ALWAYS Looking

This one is worth repeating: Buyers are ALWAYS looking. If someone needs a lot, they’re not going to take a break from looking. Buyers are searching for land year-round and they’re most likely doing so online from the comfort of their own cozy homes. A bonus to this point is that if you have any prospects come check out the land you can bet they’re pretty serious. If they venture out in cold or snowy weather to see your land you can assume they’re motivated.

2. Less Competition

Because so many sellers mistakenly believe winter won’t bring any prospects they pull down their listings. If your competitors are off the market then those serious buyers from the point above are more likely to see your listing. You won’t have to fight for the attention of buyers and you’ll get the upper hand of being in demand.

3. People Have More Time

Your potential buyers will have more free time during the holiday breaks or even on snow days depending on where they live in the country. This means they’ll have more time to devote to their search for land and they’ll definitely be using that free time! Make sure your listing doesn’t go unnoticed!

4. Buyers Want Their Property Ready for Summer

Finally, many buyers are going to want to use the winter to close on deals and get things in order, so their new land is ready to be used come spring and summer. Maybe a prospective buyer is looking to build on their land, or they want a space for family gatherings in warmer weather, whatever the reason may be the winter is the perfect time to get everything in order without losing out on precious time with their new property.

We hope that these 4 reasons were enough to convince you to keep your listings up this winter season! If you’re serious about selling your land then take advantage of the head start on other sellers! LandHub.com has access to tons of resources like blogs with all the need-to-know tips and tricks as well as plans for selling your land online, fast!

85% of land buyers look online, will they see yours?

Recreational Land 101

Recreational land is different than other land types. Its success isn’t measured in crops, but on the quality of the time spent on the land. Whether you buy recreational land as a hideaway for generations to enjoy or to create a lucrative hunting spot, recreational land does have some unique barriers to achieving success. Since this land type isn’t talked about as much as residential or farmland, we wanted to dedicate a blog post to commonly asked questions about recreational land.

What is recreational land?

As the name suggests, recreational land is land that is used for recreation. The types of recreation can vary – hunting, fishing, camping, ATV-ing, and more. In the industry, hunting is one of the most popular and well-recognized uses for recreational land.

What should I look for when buying recreational land?

Knowing what zoning regulations and restrictions impact a property is one of the most important things to look for. These regulations can impact everything from buildability to what you are allowed to hunt. Work with a land expert in your area who can help you find a property zoned right for your intended use.

If you want to use the land for hunting, keep an eye out for animals and things animals like. Food plots, a good source of water, and cover for animals to feel safe in is key for attracting game to your land.

Good neighbors can also make or break a recreational property. If the property is part of a managed neighborhood, that’s a great sign that they are dedicated to helping everyone in that community and their land to thrive. Bad neighbors (for example, poachers, people who make noises that scare animals or disturb the natural peace, or people that dump waste into the river) can ruin an otherwise perfect property.

What are the benefits of buying recreational land?

How you benefit from the land is up to you. You could let other people enjoy the property and its amenities for a fee. You could improve the land and sell it for a profit down the road.

You can also use it for your friends and family as a retreat from the rest of the world. If kept in good shape, recreational land can be something passed down for generations that will only increase in value.

How can I add value to my recreational land?

There are dozens of ways to add value to your recreational land. In his guest post for RLI, Bob Stalberger, ALC, suggests adding trail cameras as a cheap and effective way to add value.

“Buyers are always asking me to see trail camera photos from the property for sale,” said Stalberger. “When we check the analytics of our listings, it is proven that a listing with good trail camera photos vastly outperforms a listing without them. In addition, I personally advise my new buyers to go buy a thumb drive and save trail camera photos from day one, even if they have no plans of ever selling. It is great to be able to show a buyer 2-10 years of trail camera photos and allow them to see the quality and quantities of deer using the property.”

Tommy Stroud, Jr, ALC, recommends creating habitats for animals to thrive in. He says, in his guest post for the RLI Blog, about a recent property he helped to add value to “This [property] required thinning the trees back to 35-50 trees per acre. A skid steer with a grinder ate up a lot of the long-abandoned understory before Garlon (Triclopyr) was sprayed to prevent hardwood growth. These fields were burned using prescriptive fire in late February.  Continuing to burn every one or two years will keep this stand clean and provide a great habitat for all wildlife.”

Recreational land is so much more than just another land type. It can be a family heirloom passed down from generation to generation, a profitable business, or just a place to get away from the rest of the world. Interested in owning a piece of your recreational land? Make sure to find a land consultant that has the expertise required to conduct these types of transactions.

 

10 Best Fall Outdoor Adventures

The UP’s Pictured Rocks makes the list! Check out the full article HERE  from Land.com….

 

Hiking the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore | Michigan

Best fall adventures: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, Michigan
The Au Sable Light Station, surrounded by colorful fall foliage, stands on the Lake Superior shore of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore near Grand Marais. (Shutterstock)

A highlight of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is spectacular at any time of year, with dramatically eroded multicolored sandstone cliffs rising from the blue-green waters of Lake Superior. It takes on an extra layer of beauty during peak fall foliage season, which typically runs from late September until mid-October. Day hikers can enjoy 100 miles of trails to viewpoints, waterfalls, beaches, and the picturesque Au Sable Lighthouse. For longer treks, the North Country National Scenic Trail passes through the park, 15 miles of it atop the cliffs.

For a different perspective on the gorgeous coastline, take to the water on a sightseeing cruise or kayaking tour. Independent paddling is permitted but requires experience and preparation, as conditions on Lake Superior are notoriously changeable.

Plan Your Fall Adventure: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (NPS)

Your Fall Home Maintenance Checklist: 7 Tasks to Tackle Before Temperatures Dip

fall-checklist

Once autumn’s chill is in the air, we don’t think twice about swapping our tank tops for sweaters and stocking our pantry with pumpkin-spice everything. So why wouldn’t we prepare our houses for the chill, too?

Yes, that first freeze can often take us by surprise, leading to major headaches and thousands of dollars in repairs. So before you start stuffing your bookshelves with decorative gourds and planning the best Thanksgiving dinner your in-laws will ever eat, take a swing through these simple fall maintenance tasks. We promise a little prep work now will help keep your home running smoothly all season long.

1. Prep your pipes

The term “winterization” is a bit of a misnomer: Yes, you’re prepping your home for winter, but the hard work needs to happen in autumn. And that’s especially true when it comes to your pipes.

DIY: “Shut off all faucets and valves, and drain any outdoor piping, like sprinkler systems, before the temperature drops,” says Jane Li, a senior project manager at Mercury Insurance. To be extra careful, Li recommends putting away any outdoor hoses and wrapping socks around outdoor faucets.

Call in the pros: If your winterization efforts uncover a leaky pipe, hire a plumber to fix the mess before the temperature drops. On average, a plumber will cost $300, but a broken pipe could run you upward of $5,000, depending on how much water damage there is. In other words, consider this money well spent.

2. Keep out the critters

Just as you’ll spend more time indoors when the weather cools, rodents and pests will seek out a warm place, too—like your home.

“Mice especially are flexible little creatures and can get through holes that aren’t much bigger than a dime,” says Karen Thompson, an editor at InsectCop.net, which researches and evaluates pest-control products and methods.

DIY: Take a tour of your property, seeking out any cracks that might let a critter sneak inside. Seal any openings with spray foam or steel wool.

“As a bonus, doing this will let you not only avoid rodents, but also ants and fleas,” Thompson says.

Call in the pros: If there’s evidence these pesky little guys have already infiltrated your space, consider bringing in a pro. An exterminator will charge between $90 and $250 for an initial consultation, and costs will scale from there depending on what you need.

3. ‘FALL’-proof your space

Whether you’re getting up there in years or frequently hosting elderly parents, use the fall season to prevent, um, falls.

“Falls make up almost one-third of all nonfatal injuries in America, and a little prevention can go a long way toward keeping you safe,” says Jason Biddle, who runs The Helping Home, a resource for aging in place.

DIY: Use the “FALL” mnemonic to make sure your place is slip-proof:

  • Floors: Scan your floors for fall risks. Look for clutter, slippery stairs, and loose rugs. Add sticky padding to prevent slips.
  • Activities: What does your daily routine look like? You might need grab bars in the shower, or a second handrail by the stairs.
  • Lighting: Is your home bright enough to see any potential hazards? “A well-lit home can help [you] avoid tripping on dining table legs, floor planters, and out-of-sight power cords,” Biddle says.
  • Leaving: Examine your porch and outdoor paths. Are there any broken steps or overgrown shrubs that might trip you up when leaving your home?

Call in the pros: Your home might require a major aging-in-place adjustment, like installing a lift or wheelchair ramp. Costs for a motorized stairway lift start at $3,000, and a wheelchair ramp could run $1,500.

4. Remove or cover your air conditioner

Unless you live in the desert or the deep South, you probably don’t run your air conditioner during autumn. But you might be letting your system waste away if you leave it sitting out in the elements all fall and winter long, which can damage the fan and coils.

DIY: “Window units should be removed, covered, and placed in an area like the garage for safekeeping until they’re needed again,” says Richard Ciresi, who runs Aire Serv in Louisville, KY. Outdoor AC units should be properly covered.

Call in the pros: If you’ve noticed your HVAC system running sluggishly all summer, now’s a great time for an inspection, which will probably cost a little more than $300.

5. Check the fireplace

Your wood-burning fireplace has been sitting dormant for months now. Make sure it’s good to go before you light it up

DIY: Before getting your fireplace inspected, make sure you’re not putting any living things in danger.

“Check the top of the chimney for areas where birds may have nested,” Ciresi says. But check local laws first: It might be illegal to relocate active nests. Once the birds have moved on, however, you can break up the nest freely. (Just be sure to wear gloves.)

Call in the pros: Most chimney sweeps can help break up a nest, too. Besides, you’ll be needing their help for another fall must-do: sweeping the chimney. A professional inspection and sweep will cost between $100 and $250.

6. Prep your firewood pile

Nasty pests like carpenter ants or termites love hiding out in your firewood. Don’t let them hitch a ride inside.

DIY: If you’re building a firewood pile this autumn, make sure to keep those logs at least 20 feet from your home.

“This ensures that even if the wood has pests, they are less likely to transfer from the wood to your home,” Thompson says. Firewood should also be elevated during storage, which makes it even more difficult for bugs to sneak inside the wood.

Call in the pros: If you spot termites in your firewood pile, call in the pros before hauling a single log inside. Treating a local infestation might set you back $150.

7. Switch your ceiling fans

Your ceiling fans are designed to cool you off during the summer—but they also serve a need during the chilly seasons.

DIY: “Many people don’t realize the difference made with the simple reversal of your ceiling fans,” Ciresi says. “Hot air always rises, and ceiling fans are uniquely designed to direct airflow exactly where you need it most.”

Every ceiling fan has a switch hidden on its base. When the mercury level drops, flip that switch so the fan is moving clockwise.

“This updraft allows hot air to get pushed down into your rooms,” Ciresi says. “This is especially useful in rooms with very high ceilings.”

Call in the pros: Pay attention to your home’s temperature on chilly days. Are you still cold? Consider an energy audit, which will cost about $400—but may help you save tremendously on your energy bills over the next few years.

 

| Sep 20, 2018 Original article posted at Realtor.com

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